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Guide to Virginia Workers’ Compensation Claims

All employees deserve to be protected from injury or illness when working, and Virginia workers’ compensation claims laws provide this protection. If you have been injured or suffered an illness on the job, you may qualify under workers’ comp laws in Virginia to obtain financial assistance during your recovery. When a workplace injury or illness occurs, there is often confusion about what to do next. A qualified workers’ compensation attorney understands the difficulty in obtaining coverage and negotiates on your behalf so you can receive financial support when you need it most.   What Is Workers’ Compensation in Virginia?  Under the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Act, employees injured on the job may be eligible for certain benefits. Once injured, an employee must undertake the following actions:  Immediately report their injury to their employer; and  File a claim with the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission.  You must report any work-related injury or illness within 30 days of the date of the accident or 30 days from the date an observing doctor informs you that you suffer from a work-related injury. At this point, your employer must notify the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission within 10 days.  For your Virginia workers compensation claim to be covered, your accident must have occurred under the following conditions:  The accident must occur at work or during a work-related function;  A specific work activity must cause the accident; and The accident must happen suddenly at one particular time. Therefore, once you suffer an injury or illness, it’s vital to retain all information related to the accident. Memories quickly fade, and an inability to establish a direct connection to your injury and your work may negatively affect your claim.   Who Is Covered Under Workers’ Compensation?  Workers covered under the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Act include “employees.” The term employees include full-time employees and any of the following individuals: Part-time employees;  Seasonal and temporary employees;  Minors; Trainees;  Immigrants; and  Working family members. Regardless of the type of employees a business typically employs, they must carry workers’ compensation insurance in Virginia if a company employs pays two or more persons.  What Types of Injuries Are Covered? Injuries that occurred as a result of constant stress and trauma are not covered. For example, suppose a worker strains their back suddenly after lifting a heavy box and can recall when the injury occurred. In that case, this will likely be covered under workers’ comp in Virginia. Conversely, if a worker consistently lifts heavy objects and gradually experiences back pain, this is probably not covered by the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Act.  Generally, the types of injuries or illnesses covered under workers’ compensation claims include the following: Illness,  Injury, Surgery, and Disability. If your injury occurred during your work, workers comp laws in Virginia might cover and provide you with benefits. Virginia’s Workers’ Compensation Act provides the following benefits to injured workers:  Replacement of ⅔ oflost wages;  Lifetime medical benefits for permanent injuries; Permanent and total disability coverage; and Death benefits to surviving family members. It’s impossible to quantify the numerous ways an employee may suffer injuries on their job. However, when workers’ compensation claims in Virginia operate as intended, it protects workers and their loved ones by providing benefits to cover hardships resulting from work-related injury and illness.  Do I Qualify for Workers’ Comp in Virginia if I Can Still Work?  You may still qualify for Virginia workers comp even if you are still able to work. This usually applies if you can work, but not in the same capacity as before the accident. For instance, suppose you were a cargo loader at a trucking company and got injured. Now, you can work in the office, but you earn significantly less than you did loading cargo. This might entitle you to compensation.  Those unable to work in any form are eligible for total disability benefits under Virginia’s Workers’ Compensation Act. Those who work lighter duty and qualify for partial benefits receive two-thirds of the difference between their average weekly pay before and after their injury. Workers’ comp in Virginia benefits terminate most often after 500 weeks or once an employee returns to full-time work.  What if Your Claim Is Denied? There are many reasons why a workers’ compensation claim in Virginia gets denied. Despite any setback, don’t give up. Contact a workers’ compensation attorney to discuss your options. However, it’s important to remember that Virginia enforces a two-year statute of limitations for all Virginia workers’ comp claims. If an injured employee fails to file their claim within two years from the date of their accident, the statute of limitations bars them from obtaining future benefits. For this reason, you must promptly act after you receive your denial of benefits.  Contact Us  Even with Virginia workers’ compensation claims laws in place to protect you, your employer may not be willing to provide the compensation you deserve for your illness or injury. In the meantime, the illness and injury you suffered keep you from working and providing financially for your family in the same way you did before. Don’t lose hope. The attorneys at River Run Law understand the complexity of workers’ compensation laws in Virginia. We fight for what you deserve and want to help you get the money you need to move forward. Contact our office today for a free case evaluation to find out how we can help.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What Is the Average Settlement for Dog Bite Injuries?

Dogs are often referred to as “man’s best friend,” but it may be hard to think of a dog the same way after suffering a dog bite. Dog attacks happen more often than you may think and can cause significant physical injuries and emotional trauma. If you sustained injuries from a dog bite, you might be able to recover compensation from the dog owner. While there is no “average” settlement for dog bite injuries, a personal injury attorney reviews the facts of your case to determine typical dog bite settlements amounts for your situation.     What Laws Govern Dog Bite Settlements?  Virginia follows the “one-bite rule” for dog bite injury settlements. Different from strict liability cases, the one-bite rule requires a victim to show the following: The owner knew the dog was aggressive or dangerous;  The owner acted negligently; and The victim suffered injuries due to a dog bite.  The one-bite rule does not require a victim to prove that the dog had a history of violence. Instead, the one-bite rule requires a victim to show the dog possessed a propensity for violent behavior, which created a duty for the owner to use ordinary care to protect others from their animal. After suffering a traumatic dog bite, obtaining favorable dog bite injury settlements requires the professional legal knowledge of a personal injury attorney.  What Are the Legal Responsibilities of an Owner of a Dangerous Dog? Virginia law places requirements on people who own dangerous dogs. If the owner of a dangerous dog fails to implement these requirements and their dog attacks someone, an attorney uses this information to negotiate for larger dog bite injury settlements. An owner of a dangerous dog in Virginia must undertake the following actions: Obtain a dangerous dog certificate from their local animal control for $15;  The dog must wear a dangerous dog tag and must be microchipped for identification purposes;  Owners must post visible signs indicating that their dog is dangerous; While on the owner’s property, the dog must be confined indoors or confined outdoors in a secure structure;  While off the owner’s property, the dog must wear a muzzle and be leashed at all times; and  Dangerous dog owners must maintain a liability insurance policy covering at least $100,000 for animal bites. In Virginia, the meaning of a “dangerous dog” is a dog that has bitten, attacked, or inflicted injury upon a person or another pet.  What Defenses May Affect Dog Bite Settlements? Both insurance companies and the dog owner will attempt to assert a defense to your dog bite lawsuit. While one may claim many defenses, the most common defenses asserted include provocation, assumption of risk, contributory negligence, and lack of knowledge.  Provocation A dog owner might claim that you teased, taunted, or threw objects at the dog, thereby provoking the attack. Whether or not evidence of provocation exists, your attorney will work to counter these defenses with proof of the dog’s dangerous disposition.  Assumption of Risk  The dog owner may assert that the victim knew of the dog’s violent tendencies and voluntarily chose to be around the animal.  Contributory Negligence Virginia law follows a contributory negligence rule for recovery in personal injury lawsuits. Contributory negligence provides that even if a person is found to be 1% to blame for their own injuries, they are barred from recovering any damages in their personal injury lawsuit. Therefore, if dog owners claim that the victim was partly responsible for the attack, it can substantially affect personal injury dog bite settlements.   Dangers Not Known to Owner A dog owner might assert this defense if a dog acted in a manner unusual for the dog. For example, let’s presume a dog owner knows that their dog is only dangerous when not at home. However, the dog bite occurred on the dog owner’s property, an area where the dog had never been dangerous or territorial before. In this situation, the dog owner may assert that they did not know the dog’s dangerous behavior when on their private property.  These defenses may affect the outcome of personal injury dog bite settlements. However, a good personal injury attorney anticipates possible defenses to avoid any delays in reaching dog bite case settlements.  How is Compensation Determined in Typical Dog Bite Settlements?  Personal injury lawsuits, including dog bite cases, can award economic damages and non-economic damages as compensation to victims. Economic damages represent tangible and quantifiable losses. These damages may be calculated with certainty and include the following: Medical expenses,  Lost wages, and Future lost earnings. Evidence supporting your claim for economic damages may be shown through receipts, invoices, pay stubs, and tax returns.  Non-economic damages represent intangible and subjective losses. Because these damages vary significantly from one case to the next, non-economic damages may be the biggest factor affecting dog bite settlements. Non-economic damages include things like: Emotional distress,  Disfigurement, and Loss of companionship. In certain situations, it may also be possible to seek punitive damages. Punitive damages are awarded when a defendant’s conduct shows reckless disregard for the well-being of others. A court may award punitive damages to deter similar behavior in the future. Virginia caps punitive damages at $350,000.   Because circumstances vary so much from case to case, average dog bite settlement amounts don’t exist. However, a personal injury attorney evaluates the facts of each case to determine a range for dog bite injury settlements accurately. Contact Us    If you suffered a dog bite due to a neglectful dog owner, you deserve compensation for your injuries. At River Run Law, we aggressively pursue justice and fair financial compensation for your injuries. It can be physically and emotionally traumatizing to experience a dog attack, and the emotional effects often last long after your physical injuries have healed. You deserve a passionate advocate on your side. Contact the attorneys at River Run Law to discuss typical dog bite settlements and what you may be able to recover. We are here for you when you need support. We offer free case evaluations, so […]

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Guide to Contributory Negligence Laws in Virginia

When making a personal injury claim, many Virginia residents get surprised by the state’s contributory negligence rule. In most cases, this rule often prevents deserving victims from getting compensation for their injuries. Here is what you need to know about Virginia contributory negligence laws and how they work. What Is Contributory Negligence? Most states follow some form of either contributory or comparative negligence. However, these two doctrines differ significantly when it comes to personal injury cases. Based on the 1947 court case Baskett v. Banks, Virginia is a pure contributory negligence state. In that case, the Supreme Court of Virginia stated, “No person is entitled to recover from another for damages which have been occasioned by his [or her] own act or his own neglect.” This means that if the court finds the plaintiff even 1% responsible for their injuries, they may not receive compensation. So even the slightest bit of fault on the part of the injured party bars recovery of damages. Pure contributory negligence is a relatively rare and distinct doctrine found in only a handful of states. Unfortunately, this rule makes it incredibly difficult to win a personal injury case in Virginia without the help of an attorney. In contrast, other states follow a comparative negligence doctrine. This rule allows plaintiffs to recover compensation even if they share some fault in their injury. Instead of completely barring the plaintiff, most states just reduce their award by a percentage of the injured party’s fault. Examples of Contributory Negligence There are a few different ways that the Virginia contributory negligence law may play out depending on the circumstances. Here are a few situations where contributory negligence in Virginia may bar compensation: A driver hits a car after running through a stop sign, but the other driver did a rolling stop instead of a full stop; A vehicle hits a pedestrian crossing the road, but the victim decided to cross without obeying the crosswalk signal; or A person slips on someone’s icy sidewalk in the winter, but they were running instead of walking. While the defendant may be mostly responsible in these above scenarios, Virginia contributory negligence law still applies. This means that any of these victims may be barred from compensation due to their small share of negligence. A good example of Virginia’s negligence laws in action is the 1962 case, Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. v. Rosenberger. In this case, a woman slipped on a puddle of blue liquid starch on the floor in a grocery store. While this may seem like the store’s fault, the Supreme Court of Virginia decided to hold the woman responsible since she didn’t see the starch against the white floor; the store was “not required to warn” the customer of a “dangerous condition that was open and plainly visible to a person reasonably alert for [their] own safety.” While this may seem harsh, it’s the reality of personal injury cases in Virginia. Questions About Virginia Negligence Law? Contact Us Today If you sustained an injury in Virginia, don’t count on the defendant’s insurance company to be empathetic. At River Run Law, we know that fighting a personal injury claim on your own may be taxing, especially during recovery. Our goal is to advocate for your physical, emotional, and financial well-being. We manage every aspect of your case—from gathering evidence to negotiations—so you can focus on recovery. To schedule an initial consultation, give us a call or contact us online. We welcome clients throughout the state of Virginia to our office in Richmond.

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A Quick Guide to Virginia’s Motorcycle Laws

If you plan on learning to ride a motorcycle, or if you are a new Virginia resident that already has one, you should be aware of the Virginia motorcycle laws. You should also know what to do in case of an accident while you’re riding. This guide is a quick reference for motorcycle operators and passengers. Helmets and Licensing Virginia residents must pass written and skills tests to receive a motorcycle classification on their driver’s license. You can find more information about the test and the Virginia Motorcycle Operator guide on the Virginia DMV website. You must register your motorcycle with the DMV and have valid insurance. You must also have a securely fixed license plate. The Virginia motorcycle helmet law says that all riders must wear a helmet that meets certain minimum requirements. Riders must also wear eye protection or have a windshield.  Required Equipment VA motorcycle laws do not have a minimum age limit for passengers, but all passengers must use footrests/pegs, have their own seat, and wear helmets and eye protection. Motorcycles need headlights, horns, and rearview mirrors unless they are designed for trail riding and operated during daylight hours. The required lights are: At least one headlight visible from 200 feet, A tail light visible from 500 feet, A working brake light, and A license plate light visible from 50 feet. Motorcycles must have brakes on both the front and rear wheels and mufflers. Your bike must pass an annual safety inspection. Traffic Laws Some traffic signals have sensors that detect when a motorist is waiting at the light. However, motorcycles, because of their small size, sometimes fail to trigger the sensor. When this happens, VA law permits motorcyclists to pass through the light provided they come to a full stop, check all directions, and wait at least two full minutes. If the light is non-responsive, the motorcyclist must wait for at least two full cycles before proceeding.  Some people wonder, is lane splitting legal in Virginia? Lane splitting means riding a motorcycle between two lanes of stopped or slow-moving traffic that is going in the same direction. It is a way for motorcyclists to bypass congestion. While there is currently proposed legislation to allow lane splitting, it is not legal in Virginia. This is distinct from lane sharing, which refers to the practice of motorcyclists riding side-by-side or abreast in the same lane; lane sharing is legal in Virginia.  Motorcyclists may also ride in HOV lanes and on all public roadways and use facilities built with public funds, such as parking garages. You can find more detailed information about VA motorcycle laws in the Virginia Code. I Was in a Motorcycle Accident—Now What? If you’ve been in a motorcycle accident, you have two years from the date of the accident to file a lawsuit.  If you weren’t seriously injured, you could pursue the claim yourself with the other party’s insurance company.  We advise you not to provide a recorded statement to the insurance company. You should know that the first offer will most likely be a lowball offer.  If you accept it, you give up your right to recover any other money from them.  The insurance company will try to pay you the least amount possible.  However, if you received medical attention for your injuries or are concerned about being taken advantage of by the insurance company, you should speak to a VA motorcycle accident attorney.  River Run Law will negotiate with the insurance company on your behalf for a favorable settlement.  If we are unable to settle the case favorably, we would discuss your options with you and file a lawsuit if that makes sense for your situation.  Contact us today to schedule a free case analysis.  We do not charge any legal fees unless your attorney recovers a settlement or wins a lawsuit on your behalf.

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Can You File a First Responders Virginia Workers’ Comp Claim for COVID-19?

It’s been a tough year-and-a-half for Virginia’s first responders and frontline health care workers. In many instances, the First Responders are the initial people to interact with someone who is seriously ill with COVID-19. There is a good reason why they are considered the heroes of this pandemic. One of the many issues they face is what type of wage and medical benefits will be available to them if they contract COVID-19 and are off of work due to the illness or the need to quarantine.  Usually, if an EMS worker or other health care worker has an on-the-job injury, it is easy to demonstrate and prove. For example, an EMS technician can hurt their back lifting a patient into an ambulance. That is a simple workers’ compensation claim to make and win. But what happens when that same EMS worker comes down with COVID-19? From whom and how did they catch the virus? Was it on the job, treating and transporting COVID patients, or was it spread from someone while grocery shopping? These types of workers’ compensation claims would normally be much harder to prove. But experienced and skilled Virginia workers’ compensation attorneys can help make sure your rights are being protected and you get the benefits you deserve. A new law passed by the Virginia Legislature will help. Will the New COVID-19 First Responders Workers’ Compensation Law Make It Easier to File and Win a Claim? To help with the difficulty of applying for and winning workers’ compensation claims for COVID-19, the Virginia Legislature passed House Bill 1985, Senate Bill 1375, and House Bill 2207 which are designed to make it easier for health care workers and first responders to receive medical and wage benefits after contracting COVID-19. The combination of the three new laws creates a presumption of compensability when the worker is disabled or dies from COVID-19. For the presumption to be valid, the health care worker must have tested positive for the virus and be treated for COVID-19 symptoms by a medical provider. However, one caveat in the new law provides that health care workers and first responders who refuse to be vaccinated will not be eligible for the presumption that the disease was caught at work unless a physician determines that receiving the vaccination will be adverse to the person’s health. What Is a “Rebuttable Presumption” of Compensability? The new law creates a “rebuttable presumption” that if the first responder or health care worker contracted COVID-19, they did so while on the job. This makes it easier for them to win workers’ compensation wage and medical benefits if they are off of work due to the disease or die from it. It is a rebuttable presumption, though, in that if there is evidence to show that the disease was contracted outside of work, then they would not be entitled to benefits.  For example, let’s say that there is a hospital worker that in the normal course of his or her job, never comes into contact with patients, but that worker then contracts COVID-19. During the workers’ compensation hearing, the employer could attempt to rebut the presumption by arguing that the employee had to catch the virus outside of work because they were never near sick patients at work. The new law puts the burden on the employer to rebut the presumption. This is different from claims for other types of work-related illnesses, where the employee has the burden to prove that their illness resulted from work.  The Virginia Workers’ Compensation Lawyers at River Run Law Help First Responders Win Benefits If you are a first responder or health care worker and have COVID-19, contact the Virginia workers’ compensation lawyers at River Run Law. We are here for you to answer your questions and help you through the complicated process of a Virginia workers’ compensation claim. You are the frontline heroes that have helped all of us through this pandemic. Now, let us help you. Contact our office today to schedule an initial consultation to learn more about how we can protect your rights and assist you in getting the compensation you deserve.

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What Is the Virginia Statute of Limitations for Personal Injury Claims?

The Virginia statute of limitations gives you only two years after an accident to file a lawsuit. Although the law provides some limited exceptions, you likely must take action within that period. Otherwise, you could lose the right to recover compensation for your injuries and other damages. Contact an attorney as soon as possible after a car accident, truck accident, or any other type of personal injury accident. The compassionate and experienced Virginia personal injury lawyers of River Run Law understand what you’re going through. When you choose us to assist you with your claim, we mobilize immediately. We persist throughout the legal process, fighting to get you the compensation you deserve for your damages. Fill Out Our Free and Confidential Accident Form About Your Case We are here to help. If you need help getting started with your accident-injury-related claim please fill out the form below and we will contact you as soon as possible. How Does the Virginia Personal Injury Statute of Limitations Work? The clock for this time limit begins to count down from the date of your accident. If you have not filed a civil lawsuit by the time the clock runs out, you might compromise your legal rights. This time limit applies to any type of injury accident caused by another party’s negligence, including the following. Car accidents, Truck accidents, Pedestrian accidents, Motorcycle accidents, Workplace accidents, Premises liability accidents, and Animal attacks and dog bites. You can still file a lawsuit after the time limit expires. However, the defendant will likely respond by asking the court to dismiss your case. If the limitation period has indeed expired, the court will proceed accordingly. Exceptions to the Statute of Limitations in Virginia Under the Virginia statute of limitations, personal injury victims have some limited exceptions to the two-year deadline. Minor children, for example, have two years from their 18th birthday to file suit. If the victim suffered from a mental or physical disability prior to the accident, they might have longer to pursue a claim. Finally, if the defendant committed fraud, the plaintiff might have extra time to file a lawsuit. Talking to an attorney is the best way to determine whether any exceptions apply in your case. Your attorney will keep your claim on track and help ensure that you don’t miss any critical deadlines. Why Time Is of the Essence for Virginia Personal Injury Cases Virginia’s personal injury lawsuit statute of limitations is a compelling reason to act quickly after an accident. However, other compelling reasons exist for moving quickly after sustaining an injury as well. To build a compelling case, your attorney must investigate the accident and gather critical evidence. Unfortunately, evidence can disappear quickly. Witness memories fade. With each passing day, the ability to build a strong, persuasive case can degrade. For this reason, you will benefit most from contacting a qualified attorney immediately after sustaining an accident-related injury. Contact a Virginia Personal Injury Attorney for Help Speak to an experienced attorney as quickly as possible after an injury accident. The sooner you get a lawyer on board, the sooner they can start building your case. The experienced Virginia personal injury attorneys of River Run Law understand the importance of moving quickly. When you choose us to handle your case, we begin immediately. We investigate the circumstances of your accident and document every aspect of your case. We push the insurance company to negotiate in a timely manner so we can get you the funds you need now. To schedule your free consultation, or to discuss the statute of limitations in VA with experienced Virginia personal injury lawyers, contact us today. 

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Do I Need to Hire a Personal Injury Attorney in Virginia?

If you sustained injuries due to someone’s negligent or wrongful actions, you might be considering a legal claim. If so, you likely have many questions about the process. One of the most common questions potential clients ask us is, do I need a personal injury lawyer to get a settlement? Although you can pursue a claim on your own, you might not want to. Having an experienced Virginia personal injury attorney on your side provides multiple advantages. The River Run Law team knows how to get the job done for you. We have helped hundreds of clients and recovered millions of dollars in settlements and awards on their behalf. We will work tirelessly to build the most persuasive case possible for you and fight to get you the justice and compensation you deserve. When Do I Need a Personal Injury Lawyer? If you sustain injuries in an accident that you didn’t cause, you have the right to pursue legal action. Some of the most common types of accidents that warrant calling a lawyer are the following: Car accident, Motorcycle accident, Truck accident, Pedestrian accident, Workplace accident, Dog bite, and Slip and fall accident. These are not the only types of incidents that might warrant contacting an attorney, however. No matter how you sustained your injuries, consider contacting an attorney to explore your options. If you lost a loved one as a result of someone else’s negligence, you might also want to seek help from a wrongful death attorney. No amount of compensation can bring your loved one back. However, you can get justice for their loss and a more stable economic future for you and your family. Call a Personal Injury Attorney ASAP If… Some cases are straightforward and simple, allowing you to deal directly with the insurance company to get a settlement. Under those circumstances, you don’t need to have an attorney. In other cases, however, getting a lawyer onboard can mean the difference between getting a settlement and having your claim denied. These are just a few of the circumstances under which it might make more sense to get an attorney. Your Injuries Are Severe The more serious the injuries, the larger the potential settlement. The larger the potential settlement, the harder the insurance company will fight to deny your claim. Fault Is Not Obvious In some cases, another party clearly has fault for your accident, making them liable for your damages. In other cases, however, you might have to prove fault. An attorney has the knowledge and resources to build a persuasive case and fight to get you the best possible outcome. The Other Party Has a Lawyer Having an attorney can level the playing field if the other side has a lawyer. This is also true if you’re taking on a large insurance company with virtually limitless resources. They might assume you have little knowledge or the law or your legal rights. With an experienced attorney on your side, they will recognize just how serious you are about getting the justice you deserve. Contact a Virginia Personal Injury Lawyer Now You might have found your way to our site today by searching, “Do I need a personal injury attorney?” If so, take the next step and call for a free consultation. We will answer your questions and explain your options. We can help you get started on the legal process today. Contact us now to schedule your no-cost, no-obligation consultation and case analysis with one of our helpful and experienced Virginia personal injury lawyers. 

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Frequently Asked Questions

FAQ: What is Diminished Value Claim in Virginia?

Virginia motorists are entitled to compensation after an automobile wreck caused by another. This includes all property damage to their cars. Under most auto insurance policies, insurance agencies broadly promise to pay for direct damages resulting from an auto accident. In cases like this, a motorist in Virginia may be able to file a diminished value claim to compensate them for the full resale value of their car.   What Is Diminished Value Compensation?  Virginia law defines “diminished value compensation” as “the amount of compensation that an insurance company pays to a third-party vehicle owner, in addition to the cost of repairs, for the reduced value of a vehicle due to damages.” In other words, a diminished value claim allows you to recover the resale value of your car. The resale value must factor in the stigma naturally associated with a car after it’s been in an accident. Even if you can repair the car, CarFax and other companies will record its history. Imagine being on a car lot choosing between two cars identical in every respect except that one has been in a wreck. Which one would you pick?  Should I File a Diminished Value Claim in Virginia? A diminished value claim is not for everyone. For starters, the accident that caused the damage must have occurred within the Virginia statute of limitations. A statute of limitations is a law that says how much time you have to sue another person for personal injury or property damage. With respect to automobile accidents, Virginia law generally provides that motorists have three years from the date of the accident to sue the at-fault driver or their insurance carrier.   Diminished value claims are appropriate when the vehicle is valuable. The damage is usually significant. For example, a rare 1980 Corvette that suffers frame damage in an accident would carry a significant stigma to potential buyers. In this scenario, the difference between the value of the car before the wreck and the car’s value after repairs would be substantial.  In comparison, the resale value of a 1980 Honda Accord with cosmetic damage would depreciate very little after a wreck. In this situation, it might not be worth the time and money to file a diminished value claim.  Contact a Virginia Diminished Value Claim Lawyer You may have a claim for diminished value if you are not the driver at fault. Take detailed photographs of your vehicle before and after repairs. In addition, you should hire a reputable appraiser to determine the resale value of the car after repairs.  River Run Law lawyers get clients full compensation for the diminished value of their vehicle. Our firm commits to our clients. We provide the highest possible level of professionalism, responsiveness, quality, and value. Contact us now to schedule a free consultation and case evaluation.

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